Employment

10 Questions To Ask At The End of Every Job Interview

At the end of every job interview, you will be asked if you have any questions. Never walk out with saying you have no questions!

To help you out, here are 29 questions you can ask at the end of every job interview. I came across these on Business Insider.

Q1. Who do you think would be the ideal candidate for this position, and how do I compare?

This is a good question to ask at the end of every job interview. It helps you finish off on getting some early feedback from the interviewer.

Q2. Who would I be reporting to? Are those three people on the same team or on different teams? What’s the pecking order?

It’s always good to know whether your reporting line is clear or messy. I generally prefer having a clear view of the reporting line.

Q3. How has this position evolved?

Conversational question more than anything.

Q4. How would you describe the company’s culture?

This is in my books the vaguest question you can ask at the end of the job interview. It’s more of a conversation than actually getting anything of value from the answer.

Q5. Who do you consider your major competitors? How are you better?

Now, be very very careful on asking this question. I DO NOT RECOMMEND ASKING THIS QUESTION.

If you have to ask your interviewer who their competitors are, then that’s a failure. As part of your research for the job… you have to know who the companies competitors are!

Q6. Beyond the hard skills required to successfully perform this job, what soft skills would serve the company and position best?

Every employer intends to hire the skills they need for the job – what can really help you stand out is your soft skills.

Q7. Do you have any hesitations about my qualifications?

Be candid. Employers don’t like surprises, and if there are concerns with your qualifications, best get them out in the open sooner than later.

Q8. What have past employees done to succeed in this position?

When in doubt, ask direct questions. What better way to succeed than to have an employer tell you exactly what they’ve liked about previous employees in your role?

Q9. If you were to hire me, what might I expect in a typical day?

This is a great one as not only does it present what you *could* expect, it also sheds some light on how the employer views their own company. Both interesting perspectives!

Q10. How do you evaluate success here?

Another great question to ask when it comes to expectations. If you know how your employer will be rating your performance, you know up front where you’re going to need to shine.

Looking for more questions? Check out the full article: