Employment

How to Survive the First Week of Your New Job

So you battled through the application process, you were on fire in the interview and you’ve landed yourself the job. Congratulations! Of course this calls for a celebration, but the biggest obstacle is yet to come. The first week at your new job is the real test. You will want to make a good impression and this can be a scary prospect, so here are some tips from The Graduate Recruitment Bureau on how to make sure you carry on that winning streak and get off to a good start:

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REMEMBER NAMES: “And you are…?”

May sound overly simple, but it’s an everyday mishap. Most people when introduced to others easily forget names. If this happens to you, just politely ask for their name and apologise. Don’t attempt at guessing, as getting it wrong may not go down too well…

If your memory lets you down, perhaps go on to the company website and learn their names from there. Some websites will have a ‘Who Are We’ or ‘Meet the Team’ page where you will see a list of everyone who works in the office. For sites that don’t have this, try writing down everyone’s names using a bird’s eye view of the office layout.

SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITY: “Did I remember to un-tag those photos of myself…?”

Once you’ve started getting friendly with people in the office, don’t be surprised if Facebook friend requests and new followers on Twitter come your way. Ensure to be tactful with what they will be able to see on your profile, so make sure there is nothing on there that is too controversial or inappropriate. Just imagine what you would and wouldn’t want your boss to see …

Also ensure to have your account settings set to private, just in case those who haven’t added you want to have a cheeky look at your profile.

OFFICE GOSSIP: “She did WHAT?”

With any sort of social setting, gossip will always circulate and it is certainly not rare to the office environment. Stay clear from this sort of chitter chatter as you will become associated with this gossipy behaviour and it will give you a bad image. Bite your tongue and remain polite.

ASK ASK ASK: “Erm…and this means what…?”

Nobody expects you to know all the answers on your first day, so don’t hesitate to ask for help. It always looks good to ask for help, rather than sitting there twiddling your thumbs.

It’s also key to remember that sometimes if you don’t know the answer, it’s best to just sit tight and LISTEN. You may have got the job, but you aren’t the big shot. Communicate effectively and show you have some valuable skills to bring to the company, but remember you are essentially there to learn. Be open minded, ask questions and be co-operative.

WORK HOURS: “But will I be back for Eastenders?”

There is nothing worse than routinely arriving to work late and leaving early. Especially in your first few weeks, it looks good to arrive early and leave a little later. Your evening TV itinerary can wait. Normal work hours are 9 to 5, so arriving at 8.30 and leaving at 5.30 will make a good impression and will show you are dedicated and keen to work. But when I say arrive early, perhaps not at 7 in the morning, as that may look a bit odd…

TRACK ACCOMPLISHMENTS: “And I did this all by myself!”

It’s always a good idea to keep a record of all your accomplishments. These can include the results of actions you took, obstacles you overcame and opportunities you saw. This keeps you prepared for reviews with your boss, as well as for personal satisfaction and future job hunting. So keep a record and be mindful of your achievements!

ABOUT AUTHOR: 

Yasmin Codron, Online Researcher and Marketing Assistant for The Graduate Recruitment Bureau

 Image credit: Jobsmobile